Athi Kapiti Wildlife Conservancies Association

Association Summary

Athi Kapiti Wildlife Conservancies Association is still in its nascent stages registered in March 2014.

Association Details

Name: Athi Kapiti Wildlife Conservancies Association

Size: 14,646 Ha

No. of Households: 1,777

No. Of Conservancies: 10

No. of Scouts: 13

No. Of Staff:  –

  • Ereto Kipeto
  • Kipwa Conservancy
  • Kwa Kyelu Sanctuary
  • Lisa Ranch
  • Machakos Ranching
  • Nanapa
  • Olerai Wildlife Community Conservancy
  • Rimpa Consevancy
  • Silole sanctuary
  • Ulu Conservancy

Athi Kapiti Wildlife Conservancies Association is still in its nascent stages registered in March 2014. This expansive dispersal area around the Nairobi National Park includes the 6 ranches to the south, that amount to a block some 3.5 times larger than the park. It also creates a key corridor for wildlife movements between the park and the Kajiado and Amboseli plains.
Over the last 20 years, the Athi Kaputiei ecosystem has undergone rapid and drastic changes that have affected land use mostly driven by expansion of human settlement, increased fencing, wildlife poaching, and construction of physical infrastructure has increased sand mining and quarrying.

Although these changes have generated economic opportunities for some, they have come at a greater cost to wildlife and to pastoral livelihoods in general; a recent study by a group of scientists led by Dr. Joseph Ogutu of the University of Hoheinheim in Germany provides evidence of the imminent collapse of the localized migration of the wildebeest

+ Conservancies Supported
  • Ereto Kipeto
  • Kipwa Conservancy
  • Kwa Kyelu Sanctuary
  • Lisa Ranch
  • Machakos Ranching
  • Nanapa
  • Olerai Wildlife Community Conservancy
  • Rimpa Consevancy
  • Silole sanctuary
  • Ulu Conservancy
+ Association Info

Athi Kapiti Wildlife Conservancies Association is still in its nascent stages registered in March 2014. This expansive dispersal area around the Nairobi National Park includes the 6 ranches to the south, that amount to a block some 3.5 times larger than the park. It also creates a key corridor for wildlife movements between the park and the Kajiado and Amboseli plains.
Over the last 20 years, the Athi Kaputiei ecosystem has undergone rapid and drastic changes that have affected land use mostly driven by expansion of human settlement, increased fencing, wildlife poaching, and construction of physical infrastructure has increased sand mining and quarrying.

Although these changes have generated economic opportunities for some, they have come at a greater cost to wildlife and to pastoral livelihoods in general; a recent study by a group of scientists led by Dr. Joseph Ogutu of the University of Hoheinheim in Germany provides evidence of the imminent collapse of the localized migration of the wildebeest